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What am I sappy dog blogging?

October 20, 2017

Okay, and sappy cow blogging.

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Why am I hungry?

October 18, 2017

Japanese artist Yukiko Morita always loved bread. Not only was it delicious but there was something about that special combination of flour and yeast that produced wonderful flavors, beautiful tones, and adorable shapes that make people feel warm inside. This profound passion for pan (Japanese for bread and was borrowed from Portuguese) eventually led Morita down a unique path that combined lighting design and baking.

We originally discovered the artist at Tokyo Design Week back in 2014. Since then, Morita has made significant progress in making her one-of-a-kind lamps more accessible. She set up an online shop where she sells battery and wall-socket lamps. She’s developed some wonderful packaging design for them, and she even ships overseas. She also appeared at the trade show Maison & Objet in Paris over the weekend.

You can read more about Morita and her pan passion project here but yes, each lamp is made from actual bread and is preserved in a coating of resin.

From Spoon and Tamago

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What am I sappy lynx blogging?

October 13, 2017

Alaskan wildlife photographer Tim Newton heard scratching noises on his porch early one morning.  He feared it was a bear or some other unwelcome creature. When he peeked out the window, he was surprised to find a family of lynx – six kittens and their mother gamboling around on his porch.  He, of course, had a camera at hand and recorded these charming photographs.

From the Daily Mail

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What am I celebrating?

October 10, 2017

The Scandinavian community of Metropark Centralis, including those from Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland gathered at the bust of Leif Ericson in front of Shooters in Cleveland’s Flats. Leif Ericson was a Norse explorer regarded as the first European to land in North America (excluding Greenland), nearly 500 years before Christopher Columbus.

According to the Sagas of Icelanders, he established a Norse settlement at Vinland, tentatively identified with the Norse L’Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of Newfoundland in modern-day Canada.

In 1964 the United States Congress authorized and requested the president to proclaim October 9 of each year as “Leif Erikson Day”. Each year local Scandinavians meet at the bust of the exploerer which is in front of Shooter’s restaurant in the Flats. Here they toast Ericson and his maritime accomplishments with a drink of Aquavit, a 40 proof Scandinavian liqueur. Aquavit is said to get its special flavor from its trip to the Equator.

That’s right; Aquavit is placed in barrels and put on a ship bound for Australia. It must pass the Equator and return to get the right flavor. All of the sloshing in the barrels on the long ocean trip makes the drink unique. It also has a distinctive flavor, partially because of spices such as caraway. Skol!

Facts and quotes . . .

  • Leif Erikson was actually born in Iceland but his family was Norwegian. He died in Greenland in the year 1020.
  • On October 9, 1825, the first wave of Norwegian immigrants arrived on US soil in New York City. Between 1825 and 1925, nearly one-third of Norway’s population immigrated to the US.
  • Erikson named his settlement Vinland or Wineland due to the many grape vines that he discovered there.
  • There are more than 4.5 million Americans with Norwegian ancestry living in the US today, of which 55% live in the Upper Midwest states.
  • Histories have been written and more will be written of the Norwegians in America, but no man can tell adequately of the tearing asunder of tender ties, the hardships and dangers crossing the deep, the work and worry, the hopes and fears, the laughter and tears, of men and women who with bare hands carved out of a wilderness a new kingdom. – Rønning, N. N., from the book Fifty Years in America

What to do on Leif Eriksson day  . . .

  • Purchase a Leif Ericson Millennium Commemorative Coin from the US Mint. The coins were released at the beginning of the century however you can purchase some from collectors online or even try to find them in public circulation.
  • Visit one of the many Leif Erikson statues in the United States. There are statues in Boston, Milwaukee, Chicago, Cleveland, Virginia, Seattle, Minnesota and North Dakota.
  • Take a trip to Iceland, Norway or Greenland and visit the homelands of Leif Erikson.
  • Take a trip to UNESCO site of L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland, Canada. This is believed to be the site of Erikson’s first New World settlement.
  • Watch a movie about Vikings and Leif Erikson. Some movies include: Leif Ericson (2000) and The Vikings (1958), The Viking Sagas (1995) and The 13th Warrior (1999).

Leif Erikson Day was yesterday, but today is Tattoo Tuesday!

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What made me giggle?

October 9, 2017

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What am I sappy hummingbird blogging?

October 6, 2017

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What am I looking for in my change?

October 4, 2017

UK puts Isaac Newton coin into circulation.

I don’t think you understand the gravity of this.

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