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What is tattoo Tuesday about?

April 29, 2014

This article from American Digest depicts what every kid wants – enough pieces and parts of building toys to make something REALLY BIG.

 

 

This is a fantastic marble raceway – and speaking of marbles.  Wikipedia provides some insight into their history:

Various balls of stone were found on excavation near Mohenjo-daro.  Marbles are also often mentioned in Roman literature, and there are many examples of marbles from ancient Egypt. They were commonly made of clay, stone or glass.

Marbles were first manufactured in Germany in the 1800s. The game has become popular throughout the US and other countries.

Ceramic marbles entered inexpensive mass production in the 1870s.

A German glassblower invented marble scissors in 1846, a device for making marbles. The first mass-produced toy marbles (clay) made in the U.S. were made in Akron, Ohio, by S. C. Dyke, in the early 1890s. Some of the first U.S.-produced glass marbles were also made in Akron, by James Harvey Leighton. In 1903, Martin Frederick Christensen—also of Akron, Ohio—made the first machine-made glass marbles on his patented machine. His company, The M. F. Christensen & Son Co., manufactured millions of toy and industrial glass marbles until they ceased operations in 1917. The next U.S. company to enter the glass marble market was Akro Agate. This company was started by Akronites in 1911, but was located in Clarksburg, West Virginia. Today, there are only two American-based toy marble manufacturers: Jabo Vitro in Reno, Ohio, and Marble King, in Paden City, West Virginia.

 

And the tattoos:

marble1A tattoo of a marble

marble2Tattooed marble statue

marble3Someone getting airbrushed to look like marble

– not really a tattoo, but it is in the same vein

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4 comments

  1. I’ve never seen such supple marbles. 🙂


    • layered polymers, no doubt


  2. I don’t know. You build the really coolest things out of the smallest tiny things.


    • 🙂



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