Posts Tagged ‘architecture’

h1

Where am I living this time?

April 27, 2017

 

Stained glass artist and jeweler Neile Cooper had a vision for a sanctuary: a small cabin behind her home in Mohawk, New Jersey that would feature her glass designs on every available surface. The result is Glass Cabin, a structure built almost entirely from repurposed window frames and lumber that features dozens of panels of her stained glass work, depicting flowers, birds, butterflies, mushrooms and other scenes from nature. Cooper explores many of these same motifs in her popular jewelry designs. You can see more photos of Glass Cabin on Instagram.

From Colossal

Where am I Living – the Archives

h1

Where am I living this time?

April 5, 2017

Castles are usually expansive, grand affairs, but the old adage that good things come in small packages applies even to stone manors. Molly’s Lodge is the tiniest castle in the United Kingdom, and it also happens to be for sale.

Located on the northern edge of the Cotswolds in the southern tip of Warwickshire, Molly’s Lodge is a Grade II Listed (Britain’s ranking for buildings of historic interest that warrant preservation) property that was built in the 1830s by Edward Blore, the architect that expanded Buckingham Palace under the reign of Queen Victoria. It was originally used as a gatehouse for the Weston Park Estate, but is now a fully functioning home.

The 782 square foot Lodge features a Victorian cast iron fireplace, mullion windows, and a spiral staircase that leads up to the single bedroom. The property is on a .61 acre lot, with lovely gardens and a pond. There’s also a long, gravel driveway leading to the front door, an orchard, vegetable patch, and chicken run, with the idea that Molly’s Lodge could be self sufficient.

Also on the property is Molly’s Mews, a former stable that’s been converted into living space. The Mews is a bit larger than the Lodge, clocking in at 1,146 square feet. It has two carports, a single car garage, and a home office on the lower level, and an exterior staircase up to the one bedroom apartment with a kitchenette.

“Molly’s Lodge is certainly a unique Grade II listed home and there really isn’t much else like it in the area,” listing agent Iain Powis told Country Living. “The Cotswolds has a real breadth of architectural styles with everything from pretty thatched cottages through to grand manor houses and rectories, but this Gate Lodge offers something completely different. Interest so far has come from local buyers who are looking to downsize.” This might be the only castle that one could downsize to.

The property is listed for an equally small (considering it’s still a castle and all) £550,000, roughly $627,000. Especially when compared to the $30 million Guinness property.

images: Savills

Reposted from Apartment Therapy

Older “Where am I living” posts

h1

Where am I working?

March 20, 2017

DoggyMan Kansai Logistics Center

A dachshund-shaped building was designed by Nikken and completed in 2011. It functions as DoggyMan’s warehouse and distribution center and is located in Osaka. It can be seen if you’re driving along the Hanshin Expressway No. 4. An outline along the roof lights up at night, allowing drivers to see the adorable shape even when its dark.

Kirin Beer Factory (Nagoya)

Located along the Tokaido Shinkansen Line (and viewable as you’re pulling out of Nagoya Station) is the Kirin Beer Factory. The tanks are immediately recognizable because they’re painted to look just like a tall glass of beer: golden brown on the bottom with white foam at the top. If you’re actually in Nagoya you can also schedule a free tour and tasting! (They even have a hip-looking restaurant)

Meiji Chocolate Factory (Osaka)

In 2011 Meiji, known for their chocolate candy, decided to refurbish their first factory that was originally built in 1955. Since then it’s been a magical place for kids and the company wanted to instill that same magical spirit into their new factory. Given that the JR Kyoto train line runs directly south, Taisei Design proposed an idea that to make the entire façade look like a gigantic bar of chocolate that can be seen from the train. It’s 28 m high and 166 m long, which is equivalent to 38,000 bars of chocolate. If you want to visit, they offer free tours as well.

(This one is my favorite.)

Taru Tonneau in Okinawa

In Okinawa there’s a bar and eatery known as the Barrel Restaurant. The real name is Taru Tonneau (taru means barrel in Japanese) and the shop is shaped like a gigantic whiskey barrel. It’s been around since at least 2012 but its website looks like it’s from the 90s. It’s one of the more wild novelty architecture designs we’ve come across but it certainly does the trick in announcing its business.

Reblogged from Spoon and Tamago

h1

Where do I want to go to school?

February 13, 2017

schoolw880“What is it about puddles of water that makes kids want to jump right into them with all their might? It’s no doubt that outdoor play, whatever the weather, is a necessity of childhood. So if there’s any place where kids should be allowed to be kids, without being subject to the cringes and shouts of adults who are overly concerned about wet shoes, socks and pants (don’t even mention the mud), that place is preschool.

Usually when it rain, kids aren’t allowed to play outside until the ground is dry. But the new Dai-ichi Yochien in Kumamoto City is designed to make sure the puddles stay exactly where they are.

The courtyard of the school is designed to accumulate rain water so that after a heavy downpour there is a gigantic, pool-like puddle just waiting for the kids to come out and play, explains Taku Hibino. The lead architect at Hibino Sekkei designed the courtyard so that on dry days it can function as a badminton or softball court and in the winter it can even be converted to an ice skating rink. Rain or shine, these kids will always be able to go outside.

school2w880

Hibino Sekkei, and their Youji no Shiro brand, specialize in designing early education facilities. You can read more about them here.

The school itself was designed with an open floorplan in order to foster a curriculum that’s both flexible and unconstrained. Furniture is used as partitions and teachers are encouraged to mix up different classes. Students are asked to purchase their own desk and chair, which they keep and eventually take home after graduating. This keeps a continual flow of new furniture into the school, which helps in maintaining a fresh and clean aesthetic.”

school3w880

school4

reprinted from Spoon & Tamago

h1

What am I Lego-loving?

December 29, 2016

lego-white-house

“Each year during the holiday season, the White House transforms into a veritable forest of glittering Christmas trees with festive decorations as far as the eye can see. But this year, the highlight of the White House holiday décor began in Enfield, Connecticut, with seven LEGO Master Builders.

They were fast at work like Santa’s elves, designing and building 56 unique gingerbread-style houses representing each U.S. state and territory. The team also created two massive gingerbread men and a first-of-its-kind 18-foot long interlocking brick-built paper chain. 500 hours and more than 200,000 pieces later, the LEGO-built decorations are on display in the White House State Dining Room.”

More at the Brick Brothers

lego-mt-rushmore

lego-house

h1

Where am I living?

December 14, 2016

first-ever-martian-show-home-on-display-in-london-2

A Martian “Show Home” was on display at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich on November 15.  The home was designed by National Geographic and shows what Martian habitation might look like.  We were in London in November, but missed this exhibit by a few days.  Oh well, we can just look forward to the real thing in 2037.

first-ever-martian-show-home-on-display-in-london-1

 

Where am I Living – the Archives

h1

Where am I reading this time?

October 20, 2016

barn-house2

I love repurposed living spaces, such as this barn turned reading room and guest cottage.  I think it shows great design sensibilities and is a supremely livable space. I want to see what is behind that door – and to curl up in the poofy chair.

barn-house

From Bookshelf roundup

full story at house and garden

photos by Paul Massey