Posts Tagged ‘art’

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What do I covet?

May 22, 2017

Paint Box of Vizier Amenemope, c. 1427-1401 BC

Egypt, New Kingdom, Dynasty 18 (1540-1296 BC), reign of Amenhotep II

This paint box still preserves its original cakes of pigment: one cake each of red (red ocher), blue (Egyptian blue), green (a mixture of Egyptian blue, yellow ocher, and orpiment) and two of black (carbon black, from charcoal). It belonged to Amenemope, who was vizier, or prime minister, under Amenhotep II. Amenemope probably used his paint box for recreation.

This little 3,000 year old gem is in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art.  While it is not currently in the galleries, it was quite a thrill to see it when it was on exhibit.  Obviously a well and fondly used possession, seeing it transported me back in time.

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What am I sappy cake blogging?

May 5, 2017

From Iven Kawi,  the same cake artist that creates frosting cactus gardens . . . here are cakes appropriate for sappy cat,and dog, blogging . . .

I have no idea how she does this.

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Where am I living this time?

April 27, 2017

 

Stained glass artist and jeweler Neile Cooper had a vision for a sanctuary: a small cabin behind her home in Mohawk, New Jersey that would feature her glass designs on every available surface. The result is Glass Cabin, a structure built almost entirely from repurposed window frames and lumber that features dozens of panels of her stained glass work, depicting flowers, birds, butterflies, mushrooms and other scenes from nature. Cooper explores many of these same motifs in her popular jewelry designs. You can see more photos of Glass Cabin on Instagram.

From Colossal

Where am I Living – the Archives

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What do I see evolving?

April 17, 2017

“Illustrator and animator Anna Taberko  continues to produce lovely kaleidoscopic animations that depict the blooming of flowers, the evolution of animals, and the flight of bees. Most of her pieces begin life as traditional hand-drawn cel animation before being digitized and turned into sequential loops. You can follow more of Taberko’s work on Instagram and GIPHY

 

via Colossal

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What am I baking?

April 13, 2017

Who am I kidding?  These amazing creations are by Iven Kawi . . .

“Jakarta-based pastry chef Iven Kawi says she made her first honest attempt at baking in December of 2013 when she made a batch of Christmas cookies for her daughter’s school. As you can see, things have progressed quite a bit. Kawi now runs a bakery shop out of her home in Lippo Karawaci called Iven Oven where she creates elaborately decorated baked goods. Among her specialties are cakes adorned with terrarium environments where buttercream frosting is sculpted into an abundance of cacti and flower petals atop beds of crumbly sand or dirt. You can follow more of her work on Instagram. “

via Colossal

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Am I playing with my food?

March 13, 2017

Not me, but Japanese artist Gaku is . . .

 

“Japan has a rich tradition of food carving called mukimono. If you’ve ever eaten at a fancy restaurant in Japan you might have found a carrot carved into a bunny, garnishing your plate. But in the hands of Japanese artist Gaku, the art of fruit and vegetable carving is elevated to a new realm of edible creations.”

 

“One constraint to carving fruits and vegetables is that sometimes you must work fast. The moment a peel is removed, oxidization will start to discolor your artwork. So, depending on the variety, Gaku’s carvings are probably created within several minutes. Armed with a tool similar to an x-acto knife and a fruit or vegetable from the grocery store, Gaku carves intricate patterns that are often inspired by traditional Japanese motifs.

Gaku points out that the banana is great fruit to practice with because it’s cheap and easy to carve. When asked what he does with all his creations after he’s done, his reply is simple: he eats them. “Except for the banana peel.”

You can see more of Gaku’s creations on his instagram account.”

 

reposted from Spoon & Tamago

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Whose work do I find amazing?

March 2, 2017

 

More at her website