Posts Tagged ‘art’

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Why am I all a-twitter?

July 6, 2017

“Warsaw-based embroidery artist Paulina Bartnik stitches colorfully lifelike brooches of birds and other tiny creatures in a dense style called needle painting. Each object begins as a piece of wool which she prods with a special needle in a process called dry felting which results in a surface ideal for embroidery. She then paints with a needle directly on the felt and embroiders the finer details. You can see more of her creations in her Etsy shop.”

 

from colossal

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What do I think is kind of fishy?

July 5, 2017

“The goldfish holds a very special place in the heart of any child who’s ever been to a matsuri (street festival) in Japan. Kingyo-sukui is the game of “goldfish scooping” and is a staple of any summer street festival, along with the masks, water balloon yo-yos, fireworks and yummy food.

But for artist Riusuke Fukahori, the goldfish was not just a relic of long-lost childhood. As he painfully lay in his room one night, struggling and suffering, about to give up on his art, he looked over and saw a goldfish. His neglected fish of 7 years sputtered about in a cesspool of mold and feces – a common fate endured by most festival souvenirs.

Fukahori felt a shiver run down his spine. What he suddenly saw was a beautiful animal, glowing in bright red, living and surviving. The artist pulled out his paint and set to work, immediately triggering some sort of chemical reaction in his brain. Fukahori had looked far and wide – in Europe, the U.S. and Japan – for his muse. But in an instantaneous form of enlightenment he knew that all along it was right there in his room, inside that dirty fish tank. The goldfish, writes Fukahori, was my salvation.

And did you know, with a little help from the grammar gods, Kingyo-sukui (金魚すくい), the festivities of goldfish scooping, can also be read 金魚救い- goldfish salvation.”

Ref: Spoon and Tamago

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Why do I have wings on my feet?

June 5, 2017

Japanese artist, Keiko Otsuhata, designed these high heels to look like pigeons.  She then wore them to the park to see if she could attract the genuine article with her artifice.  I don’t think she was particularly successful, but I give her credit for an amusing and original idea.

Read the whole story here on Spoon and Tomago.

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What am I coveting?

May 31, 2017

Winsor and Newton is sponsoring a contest to win this antique wooden paint box.

Want.

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What do I covet?

May 22, 2017

Paint Box of Vizier Amenemope, c. 1427-1401 BC

Egypt, New Kingdom, Dynasty 18 (1540-1296 BC), reign of Amenhotep II

This paint box still preserves its original cakes of pigment: one cake each of red (red ocher), blue (Egyptian blue), green (a mixture of Egyptian blue, yellow ocher, and orpiment) and two of black (carbon black, from charcoal). It belonged to Amenemope, who was vizier, or prime minister, under Amenhotep II. Amenemope probably used his paint box for recreation.

This little 3,000 year old gem is in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art.  While it is not currently in the galleries, it was quite a thrill to see it when it was on exhibit.  Obviously a well and fondly used possession, seeing it transported me back in time.

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What am I sappy cake blogging?

May 5, 2017

From Iven Kawi,  the same cake artist that creates frosting cactus gardens . . . here are cakes appropriate for sappy cat,and dog, blogging . . .

I have no idea how she does this.

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Where am I living this time?

April 27, 2017

 

Stained glass artist and jeweler Neile Cooper had a vision for a sanctuary: a small cabin behind her home in Mohawk, New Jersey that would feature her glass designs on every available surface. The result is Glass Cabin, a structure built almost entirely from repurposed window frames and lumber that features dozens of panels of her stained glass work, depicting flowers, birds, butterflies, mushrooms and other scenes from nature. Cooper explores many of these same motifs in her popular jewelry designs. You can see more photos of Glass Cabin on Instagram.

From Colossal

Where am I Living – the Archives