Posts Tagged ‘design’

h1

What am I eating?

April 24, 2017

 

And for dessert

h1

What do I see evolving?

April 17, 2017

“Illustrator and animator Anna Taberko  continues to produce lovely kaleidoscopic animations that depict the blooming of flowers, the evolution of animals, and the flight of bees. Most of her pieces begin life as traditional hand-drawn cel animation before being digitized and turned into sequential loops. You can follow more of Taberko’s work on Instagram and GIPHY

 

via Colossal

h1

What am I baking?

April 13, 2017

Who am I kidding?  These amazing creations are by Iven Kawi . . .

“Jakarta-based pastry chef Iven Kawi says she made her first honest attempt at baking in December of 2013 when she made a batch of Christmas cookies for her daughter’s school. As you can see, things have progressed quite a bit. Kawi now runs a bakery shop out of her home in Lippo Karawaci called Iven Oven where she creates elaborately decorated baked goods. Among her specialties are cakes adorned with terrarium environments where buttercream frosting is sculpted into an abundance of cacti and flower petals atop beds of crumbly sand or dirt. You can follow more of her work on Instagram. “

via Colossal

h1

What am I knitting this time?

April 12, 2017

Kniterate is a compact industrial knitting machine created for designers and entrepreneurs that facilitates the one-off creation of garments. Built by London-based designer Gerard Rubio, Kniterate is meant to act as a sort of 3D printer for knitwear, allowing you to create digital designs in Photoshop and turn them into a wearable garments in just a few hours. The machine is capable of knitting scarves, sweaters, dresses, ties, or even the components of shoes. Kniterate could dramatically reduce lead time for a fashion business or design school in need of quick prototyping, or help a more ambitious artist in the fabrication a completely unique wardrobe. Learn more over on Kickstarter. (via Inhabitat, Make:)

Kniterate is a kickstarter campaign – reblogged from Colossal

h1

Whose work do I find amazing?

March 2, 2017

 

More at her website

h1

Where do I want to go to school?

February 13, 2017

schoolw880“What is it about puddles of water that makes kids want to jump right into them with all their might? It’s no doubt that outdoor play, whatever the weather, is a necessity of childhood. So if there’s any place where kids should be allowed to be kids, without being subject to the cringes and shouts of adults who are overly concerned about wet shoes, socks and pants (don’t even mention the mud), that place is preschool.

Usually when it rain, kids aren’t allowed to play outside until the ground is dry. But the new Dai-ichi Yochien in Kumamoto City is designed to make sure the puddles stay exactly where they are.

The courtyard of the school is designed to accumulate rain water so that after a heavy downpour there is a gigantic, pool-like puddle just waiting for the kids to come out and play, explains Taku Hibino. The lead architect at Hibino Sekkei designed the courtyard so that on dry days it can function as a badminton or softball court and in the winter it can even be converted to an ice skating rink. Rain or shine, these kids will always be able to go outside.

school2w880

Hibino Sekkei, and their Youji no Shiro brand, specialize in designing early education facilities. You can read more about them here.

The school itself was designed with an open floorplan in order to foster a curriculum that’s both flexible and unconstrained. Furniture is used as partitions and teachers are encouraged to mix up different classes. Students are asked to purchase their own desk and chair, which they keep and eventually take home after graduating. This keeps a continual flow of new furniture into the school, which helps in maintaining a fresh and clean aesthetic.”

school3w880

school4

reprinted from Spoon & Tamago

h1

What am I weaving?

January 24, 2017

tweedClick on the photo for a charming video about the making of Harris tweed in the Outer Hebrides.

Credit:  The Atlantic