Posts Tagged ‘food’

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What am I cooking?

January 11, 2018

These recipes are from the Cutco Cook Book – a book that came along with a set of knives my parents bought back in the 60s (I think).

Making a Mornay sauce with American cheese and canned mushrooms may have even come from a earlier decade.  There was a time in America when all cheese was American, or perhaps cheddar, and there was no pasta – only spaghetti and macaroni.  I think these recipes originated from that mind set.  I still have some of the knives, though.

 

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What am I cooking?

January 4, 2018

I think I have mentioned before that I own over 300 cookbooks.  I especially love the ones that were published by companies to promote their products, such as The Dessert Lovers’ Handbook from Eagle Brand.  It does not have a publication date, but the design looks as if it is from the late ’60s or early ’70s.

A dear friend recently gave me the lovely pots de creme set shown above and I wanted to put it to use.  After looking at a bunch of recipes, I landed back on my old favorite from Eagle Brand milk.

This is an easy and delicious recipe.  It was just the thing for my new dishes.  It is very rich, so the small size of the cups is a good thing.  I added whipped cream.

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What am I eating?

October 2, 2017

“This spectacular extreme closeup of a strawberry was taken by photographer Alexey Kljatov; he explains how he took the photo:

“Focus stacking + averaging (10 groups with different focus, each group contains 8 identical shots for averaging). The problem with this shot was that strawberry is too glossy (I put white plastic bag around berry to diffuse daylight).”

OK, now it’s biology time. In case you’re wondering what you’re seeing there, the little yellow-reddish thing is called an achene — it’s not a seed. Each strawberry has over 100 achenes, each with a single seed inside of them. So the achenes are the fruits, and the seeds are inside of them… so then what’s the strawberry? Well, the strawberry is not a fruit, and it’s not even a berry in the botanical sense. It is accessory tissue for an aggregate fruit, formed from multiple ovaries of one flower. But it can get even stranger than that. Strawberries can be hermaphroditic, with male and female parts, or with distinct genders. They do not even rely on seeds to reproduce.

So the strawberry is technically not a berry, it’s not even a fruit. It’s an aggregate from the plant’s receptacle, the thickened part of a stem from which the flower organs grow.

But that doesn’t make them any less delicious or nutritious. Studies have correlated strawberries with a decreased cardiovascular disease risk. Furthermore, phytochemicals present in strawberries have been shown to anti-inflammatory or anticancer properties. In our hearts (and stomachs), strawberries will forever be delicious and healthy fruits.

If you want to truly appreciate the beauty of this photo, check out the full 2695 x 2695 pixel resolution image here.”

From ZME Science

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What am I celebrating?

August 10, 2017

Today is S’mores Day.  I loved s’mores as a child, but I must admit they are too, too sweet for me now.  However, this version, with bourbon flavored marshmallows, may be worth a second look.

Campfire S’mores

Bourbon-Vanilla Marshmallows

(Makes 1 sheet tray)

17½ ounces water
49 ounces sugar
26½ ounces egg whites
25 gelatin leaves
8 vanilla pods, seeds scraped
¼ ounce bourbon

Take sugar and water to 140 degrees Celsius, monitored with a candy thermometer. Add to egg whites. Then add gelatin and whisk until cool. Spread onto greased silicon paper. Top with silicon paper and allow to set. Portion and dust with cornflower or an icing sugar mix.

Graham Crackers

1½ cups all-purpose flour, plus more for working
1 cup whole wheat flour
½ cup untoasted wheat germ
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
¾ cup light brown sugar, packed
2 tablespoons honey

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk flours, wheat germ, salt, baking soda, and cinnamon in a medium bowl; set aside.

Put butter, brown sugar, and honey into the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment; mix on medium speed until pale and fluffy, 2 – 3 minutes, scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Reduce speed to low. Add the flour mixture, and mix until combined. Turn out dough onto a floured surface, and divide into quarters.  Roll out each piece between 2 sheets of floured parchment paper into rectangles a bit larger than 9 by 6 inches, about ⅛-inch thick.

Using a pizza cutter, trim the outermost edges of each rectangle, and divide into 3 6-by-3-inch rectangles. Pressing lightly, so as not to cut all the way through, score each piece in half lengthwise and crosswise, to form 4 3-by-1½-inch crackers. Stack parchment and dough on a backing sheet and chill in the freezer until firm, about 20 minutes.

Remove 2 sheets of dough from freezer. Pierce crackers using the tines of a fork. Transfer to large baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Bake, rotating halfway through, until dark golden brown, 8 – 9 minutes. Repeat with remaining dough. Let cool on sheet 5 minutes; transfer crackers to wire racks to cool completely.


For more information on The Stella and its Campfire restaurant, visit the hotel’s website.

 This recipe is from Cowboys and Indians magazine.  Photo credit Sarah Jacober Spitzer
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What am I eating?

June 7, 2017

I used to read and enjoy a blog that reviewed service station food offerings.  There have been no postings there for a while, but on our recent road trip, I found some interesting snacks such as the Oreo candy bar above (what else would you do with broken Oreos?) and these:

And to wash it all down:

Nope, we did not try any of them, but if you have seen any interesting nibbles like these, I would be interesting in hearing about them.

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What am I celebrating on tattoo Tuesday?

May 16, 2017

This is a huckleberry milkshake recently acquired at the travel center, gas station, restaurant, gift shop, casino and espresso bar in St. Regis, Montana.

Today is Soda Jerk Day

The term ‘soda jerk’ was a pun on ‘soda clerk’, the formal job title of the drugstore assistants who operated soda fountains, and was inspired by the “jerking” action the server would use to swing the soda fountain handle back and forth when adding the soda water. The soda fountain spigot itself typically was a sturdy, shiny fixture on the end of a metal pipe or other similar structure sticking out of the counter by several feet and curving towards where the glasses would be filled. The unflavored carbonated water was used to make all of the drinks. Consequently, the tap handle was typically large, as a busy shop would have the soda jerker using it frequently. This made the mixing of drinks a center of activity at the soda fountain counter. – Wikipedia

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What am I sappy cake blogging?

May 5, 2017

From Iven Kawi,  the same cake artist that creates frosting cactus gardens . . . here are cakes appropriate for sappy cat,and dog, blogging . . .

I have no idea how she does this.