Posts Tagged ‘food’

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Am I playing with my food?

March 13, 2017

Not me, but Japanese artist Gaku is . . .

 

“Japan has a rich tradition of food carving called mukimono. If you’ve ever eaten at a fancy restaurant in Japan you might have found a carrot carved into a bunny, garnishing your plate. But in the hands of Japanese artist Gaku, the art of fruit and vegetable carving is elevated to a new realm of edible creations.”

 

“One constraint to carving fruits and vegetables is that sometimes you must work fast. The moment a peel is removed, oxidization will start to discolor your artwork. So, depending on the variety, Gaku’s carvings are probably created within several minutes. Armed with a tool similar to an x-acto knife and a fruit or vegetable from the grocery store, Gaku carves intricate patterns that are often inspired by traditional Japanese motifs.

Gaku points out that the banana is great fruit to practice with because it’s cheap and easy to carve. When asked what he does with all his creations after he’s done, his reply is simple: he eats them. “Except for the banana peel.”

You can see more of Gaku’s creations on his instagram account.”

 

reposted from Spoon & Tamago

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What was invented on tattoo Tuesday?

March 7, 2017

Cornflakes were invented by Dr. John Harvey Kellogg as part of the health regimen at his Battle Creek Sanitarium in 1896.  Dr. Kellogg and his brother had some pretty funny ideas about health and healthy living, but the late nineteenth century was a time of plentiful ideas and experimentation that was based on wonky science.  At Battle Creek these ideas also led to the invention of flaked cereals, graham crackers, and rice krispies.

If you want to read the other reason that cornflakes were invented, click here (parental guidance suggested.)

For tattoo Tuesday, the Kellogg’s rooster . . .

 

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What am I baking today?

March 1, 2017

st-david

March 1st is St. David’s Day.

St. David is the patron saint of Wales. He was a preacher and church founder, born sometime in the 6th century.  According to Wikipedia, “His best-known miracle is said to have taken place when he was preaching in the middle of a large crowd at the Synod of Brefi: the village of Llanddewi Brefi stands on the spot where the ground on which he stood is reputed to have risen up to form a small hill. A white dove, which became his emblem, was seen settling on his shoulder.” Leeks and daffodils are also associated with St. David and are symbols of Wales.

welsh-cakes

I propose baking Welsh Cakes to commemorate the day . . .

“These soft, tender cakes are a cross between a pancake and a baking powder biscuit, with elements of cookies and muffins thrown in for good measure. Sturdy enough to be eaten out of hand, they can be served plain; sprinkled with sugar (or cinnamon-sugar, our favorite); or spread with butter, and gilded with sugar or jam. In addition, they’re excellent the next day, warmed in the toaster as you’d warm toaster cakes.

Native to Wales, as their name suggests, Welsh Cakes are the perfect breakfast on the feast day of their native country’s patron saint, St. David — celebrated each year on March 1.”

  • 3 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 to 3/4 teaspoon salt**
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 cup cold butter**, cut into pats or diced
  • 3/4 to 1 cup currants
  • 2 large eggs beaten with enough milk to yield 3/4 cup liquid
  • **Use 1/4 teaspoon salt if you use salted butter; 3/4 teaspoon if you use unsalted butter.

Instructions

  1. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and nutmeg.
  2. Work in the butter until the mixture is fairly evenly crumbly; a few larger pieces of butter can remain.
  3. Mix in the currants.
  4. Add the milk/egg mixture, mixing until the everything is moistened.
  5. Turn the sticky dough out onto a well-floured work surface, and divide it in half. Shape each half into a thick, 4″ to 5″ disc. Cover one of the discs with plastic, and refrigerate. Leave the other on the floured work surface.
  6. Roll the soft dough into a 9 1/2″ circle; it should be about 1/4″ thick. Be sure to lift up the dough and flour underneath it as you roll, so it doesn’t stick.
  7. Using a 2 1/2″ to 3 1/2″ biscuit or other round cutter, cut the dough into circles. Gather and re-roll the scraps, cutting until you’ve used all the dough.
  8. Heat an ungreased skillet over low-medium heat; an electric frying pan or skillet, set at 325°F, works well here.
  9. Fry the cakes for about 2 1/2 minutes on each side, until they’re golden brown and cooked all the way through. It’s best to fry one sample cake first, to see if your pan is the right temperature.
  10. Transfer the fried cakes to a rack to cool.
  11. Repeat with the refrigerated dough. Cut the circles, then let them warm at room temperature for about 10 minutes before frying.
  12. Dust the finished cakes with cinnamon-sugar or superfine (castor) sugar; or split them, butter, and spread with jam. A pot of tea is the perfect accompaniment.
  13. Yield: about 2 dozen 2 3/4″ cakes

This recipe is from King Arthur Flour

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What am I celebrating?

February 28, 2017

Happy Pancake Day – I mean Fat Tuesday- I mean Carnivale or Karneval – I mean Shrove Tuesday – I mean Lupercalia (where did that come from?)

mardi-gras-face

Today is Mardi Gras

This celebration has its roots in a number of different traditions, both religious and pagan.

king-cake

So eat your King Cake, pancakes, paczkis, jambalaya, fastlagsbulle, and celebrate.

BEN GARVER — THE BERKSHIRE EAGLE Fresh paczki are a Polish seasonal pastry served until Lent. The pastries resemble doughnuts but have slightly different dough and a lot more filling.

BEN GARVER — THE BERKSHIRE EAGLE
Fresh paczki are a Polish seasonal pastry served until Lent. The pastries resemble doughnuts but have slightly different dough and a lot more filling.

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What is tattoo Tuesday about?

February 21, 2017

sticky-buns

Today is Sticky Bun Day – so bake up a batch . . .

cinnamon-rolls-8

cinnamon-roll-tattoo

Or if you are too busy to bake, order some from The Cupboard Cafe in New Harbor, Maine.

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cupboard

Get some bacon, too.

bacom-tattoo

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Why am I smiling?

December 1, 2016

cutie

Cuties are back in the stores!

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What is Wednesday’s Wonderment?

November 30, 2016

“Building a gingerbread house is a common family tradition for the holidays, but Nemacolin Woodlands Resort has taken the tradition to a whole new level this year.

Visitors can walk through the doors of the life-size gingerbread house, which is built with 500 pounds of flour, 600 pounds of powdered sugar, 10 gallons of eggs and 200 pounds of assorted candy.

gingerbread-house-nemacolin-2

Photo shows the building under construction

Pastry chef Scott Tennant headed up the effort to build and decorate a 12-by-12-by-14-foot gingerbread house inside the lobby of Chateau Lafayette, one of the Farmington resort’s hotels.

The resort’s carpenters started the process in October by building a complete wooden house in two- to three-foot sections that could be separated, carried through the lobby’s front doors piece by piece, and reconnected.

By mid-November, the pastry shop was busy cranking out 2,500 gingerbread bricks. The workers laid the bricks against the wooden walls, plastering them together with royal icing “mortar.” That’s about 700 to 800 pounds of gingerbread.

Pastry makers decorated the outside of the house with Gummies, hard candies and other confections. Mr. Tennant said the workers aimed to add splashes of color without going “over the top” so they could create a relatively realistic effect.

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The final gingerbread bakery

Indoors, the house has gingerbread planks resembling paneling along the lower third of the walls, with a gingerbread chair rail lined with candy. A baker will offer samples inside the gingerbread house for a few hours each day through Jan. 1, and on Jan. 2 the house will come down.

For several years, Nemacolin has built gingerbread displays: a castle, a train, a Snoopy’s Christmas display, and last year, a large gingerbread house. But this is the first year the resort has built something the public can actually walk through.

When the resort first started making gingerbread displays a few years ago, all work was done in secret, behind a curtain. When workers decided to change things up and construct their displays out in the open, they immediately attracted a following. People would stop by to watch the process and exclaim over how good the gingerbread smelled.

“The workers would take extra pieces and put frosting on them and give them to people,” Mr. Tennant said.

That’s what got him thinking about building something people could walk inside.

The final product has taken a team of 15 people a total of 600 to 800 hours to make.

By the numbers:

600 pounds powdered sugar

500 pounds flour

200 pounds assorted candy

120 pounds honey

120 pounds molasses

110 pounds brown sugar

60 pounds shortening

15 gallons egg whites

10 gallons eggs

6 pounds baking soda

5 pounds ginger

3 pounds allspice

3 pounds cinnamon

From the Post-Gazette, courtesy Robb